OUR APPETITE FOR THE LATEST FASHION IS DRAINING THE PLANET OF ITS RESOURCES.

Therefore we decided to DESIGN A MORE RESPONSIBLE JEWELLERY BRAND. in our collections we attempt to provide the
USERS WITH THE TOOLS AND MATERIALS THAT CAN BE EASILY MAINTAINED THROUGH TIME IS A WAY OF ALLOWING PRODUCTS TO GROW WITH THE USER. 
BY MAKING CONSTRUCTIONS OF HIGH QUALITY AND APPLY THE MATERIALS WHERE IT BEST FITS WE CONTRIBUTE TO THIS STATEMENT.
WE UP-CYCLE METAL WASTE FROM THE MOST BEAUTIFUL DUMPSTERS IN THE WORLD - A SMALL METAL PRODUCER RIGHT HERE IN SKÅNE, sweden.

 



 

Copper,  29Cu

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Copper is a chemical element with symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a reddish-orange color. It is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys.

Copper is found as a pure metal in nature, and this was the source of the first metal to be used by humans, ca. 8,000 BC; it was the first metal to be smelted from its ore, ca. 5,000 BC; it was the first metal to be cast into a shape in a mold, ca. 4,000 BC; and it was the first metal to be purposefully alloyed with another metal, tin, to create bronze, ca. 3,500.[3]

BRASS, CUZN2 

 

Brass is a metal alloy made of copper and zinc; the proportions of zinc and copper can be varied to create a range of brasses with varying properties.[1] It is a substitutional alloy: atoms of the two constituents may replace each other within the same crystal structure.

By comparison, bronze is principally an alloy of copper and tin.[2] However, bronze and brass may also include small proportions of a range of other elements including arsenic, phosphorus, aluminium, manganese, and silicon. The term is also applied to a variety of brasses, and the distinction is largely historical.[3] Modern practice in museums and archaeology increasingly avoids both terms for historical objects in favour of the all-embracing "copper alloy".[4]